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Wheather's not to blame for your aches and pains

16-03-2017

Actually, the weather has nothing to do with your aching joints

It's long been thought episodes of both back pain and arthritis can be triggered by changes in the weather, including temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation, but researchers now say that it isn't so. It’s official (again): Changes in weather aren’t to blame for body aches — no matter how insistently relatives rant that rain or wind or heat wreaks havoc with their back and joints. Such complaints have been going on for centuries, but they weren’t true then and they’re not true now, per scientists at Australia’s George Institute for Global Health. Various studies prove it. Sorry, Grammy and Gramps and everyone else who likes to fault Mother Nature.

George researchers surveyed 1,350 subjects with lower back pain or osteoarthritis to compare the weather at the time people first noticed pain with weather conditions — temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation — one week and one month before the onset of pain. The conclusion: “There is absolutely no link between pain and the weather in these conditions.” Pretty unequivocal.

In a previous study, the Institute reached the same conclusion and was met with a storm of criticism on social media. Chris Maher, Ph.D., head of George’s musculoskeletal division, expects more of the same reaction since people are more likely to note pain when it’s cold and rainy but ignore discomfort when it’s mild and sunny.

People like to look for patterns in events in their life, Maher told the Daily News. “That trait can have a benefit, and is how our knowledge about the world arises,” he said. “Problem is people are fallible and can get it wrong. In the case of inclement weather triggering aches and pains, it is time to let go of that belief.”

Source: George Institute for Global Health. "Weather's not to blame for your aches and pains." Science Daily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2017.